How To Choose A Bike Correctly

In recent times the western world has undergone a transportation change. Cars have long been the most likely mode of transport in developed countries, however bikes are beginning to rise in popularity. It could be down to efforts to remain green, perhaps people want to save money on high gas prices, or maybe many people just want to get in shape! Either way there are now more bikes on the road then ever before. Perhaps you have been giving some thought to getting a bike yourself? If this is the case it is important you know what to look for, the following tips will help you in your quest to find a suitable bike.

It is important to know how your bike comes to a stop. Be sure you know how your brakes work and which type you will likely need. If you are choosing a bicycle for sporadic hobby riding, you can get by with the brakes that are little more than pads that squeeze your tires to keep them from moving. If you are going to be using your bicycle more often or in heavy terrain, you will want brakes that are a little more hard core and complicated. The best kind of braking system to choose for this style of riding is the disk brakes, because they are build to handle more and are less apt to fail under stress.

For a road bike you should take away 9" from the inseam measurement you took earlier. This is because of the size of the tires on your road bike. Road bikes are meant for city cycling—the tires are thinner and work best on concrete paving. If you are looking for a mountain bike, you will want to subtract about a foot (twelve inches) from your inseam measurement. Mountain bikes have different tires than a road bike. Mountain bike tires will be thick and designed for mountainous terrain. You can of course use a mountain bike for road cycling but this isn't supposed to be their primary use.

Be sure to allow room between the crossbar and yourself. When you get a bike be sure to move the seat up a couple of inches from the crossbar. Make certain you can still place both feet flatly on the ground. Which bike you get will greatly alter the clearance you will require. For example a touring bike will require around an inch. If you are buying a mountain bike you’ll want more—three inches or so between you and the crossbar. There are many different factors to take into account when finding the right bicycle. Is this a bike you are going to be riding every single day or is it a bike you are only going to additional hints ride every now and them? Which height is most comfortable for you? Do you prefer your feet to rest flat on the ground or do you like to have some room between them and the ground when you are sitting on the bicycle’s seat? You will want to answer all of these important questions, as you make your bicycle selection.

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